Why doesn’t the dark side of the Earth freeze at night in the globe model?

If the Earth is a sphere (or an oblate spheroid), and the two supposed poles of the ball Earth are perpetually covered with ice and experience extreme freezing cold temperatures, then why doesn’t the dark side of the supposed ball Earth experience extreme cold temperatures every night when it is facing away from the sun as the Earth spins on its axis? The distance between the Sun and the equator at night, for instance, would be far greater than the distance of the poles from the Sun, and therefore¬†should experience extreme drops in temperature. But that does not happen. As we all know, temperatures at the equator at night usually don’t reach the freezing point.

Why doesn't the dark side of the globe freeze at night?

 

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2 thoughts on “Why doesn’t the dark side of the Earth freeze at night in the globe model?

  1. The poles are not cold because they are farther than the sun. They are cute or because they rarely receive direct sunlight – ey are always angled with respect to the sun, so that the sun never gets very far above the horizon.
    The atmosphere also acts as an insulating blanket, holding in heat even at night.

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